TagWriting

WIP Update #5/NaNoWriMo Update

This is going to be a combined update for a couple of different writing-related items at this point, as I felt like neither of them were long enough to warrant their own post at this point. That said, both were important enough that I wanted to be able to post about them on the blog.

In September, I asked many of you (both here and on Twitter) to give me your thoughts as to what topics you’d like to see if I did another NaNoWriMo Tips series this year. I got a lot of good ideas for what topics I could potentially talk about and even had started talking with a couple of different folks about potentially guest blogging for the series this year, as it seemed like a good idea.

I also recently wrote this short story that I really liked. In rather exciting news, it seems that a lot of you liked the story as well — which is great considering that the story itself is intended to very much be an introduction to what would likely be a larger story, if not a full novel. I took a poll asking people whether they’d rather see me do the NaNoWriMo Tips series again this year or if I should do the full version of this story on my blog for NaNoWriMo.

The results of the poll are irrelevant for reasons I’ll get into momentarily. The story won by a decent margin (69%-31%). But that’s not the reason I’m writing this post.


I’ve been working on my current work in progress novel for quite some time now. I’ve written four different posts to this point sharing where I’m at in the process of getting it to the point where I could look to publish it, all with varying levels of working having been done when I wrote said posts. In my most recent WIP post, I went through this long list of things that allowed me to get to the point where I had written three drafts of the book. Within that list was a note mentioning how I had a mental breakdown that led me to write a blog post about the duality of writing. Even still, there was a footnote buried in that list1I use the term buried loosely here. It’s obvious the footnote was there. That said, I know full well most of the views I get on my posts come from folks who don’t click on the footnotes. I’ve looked at the data. mentioning how this wasn’t just a one-time occurrence. Granted, the breakdown that led to that post was a one-off, but the act of breaking down was not — and is not — an isolated incident for me.

I’m finally starting to get the help I need to be able to deal with some of the stuff that caused everything I described in the paragraph above. I’m sure it’s going to be a long process — mostly because I’m already realizing there was a lot more that I need to work through than even I initially realized — and I’m not particularly ready to talk about it here yet. That may well be something that happens in the future. After all, the whole reason I started blogging/writing back in 2009 was because of a suggestion given to me by the therapist I had gone to see then when I told her I couldn’t afford to come to our second appointment. But that time likely isn’t any time soon.

That said, I bring all of this up because of something that happened somewhere along in the process of finally reaching the point of realizing that I need help. I found the place from which one of the characters in my book is coming from. I admittedly didn’t expect it. The character isn’t necessarily the character I was looking to continue building on in the next draft of my book. But at the same point in time, doing so not only makes a lot of sense to me but feels a bit more meaningful.


I say all of that to say I won’t be doing NaNoWriMo Tips in November of this year, nor will I be starting a NaNoWriMo project based on the short story linked in this post. If you’re looking for NaNoWriMo help, I would encourage you to pop over to r/nanowrimo on Reddit, as it was a great resource for me last year. I likely will still turn that short story into a book in the future, as it’s a story that has existed — at least in part — in my head for nearly six years now.

This November will be dedicated to working on my work in progress and helping to build it out to where I want it to be. I’m hoping that between whatever notes my editor has for me by that point, my own quick plot consistency review I’ve been working on, and the newfound voice for one of the story’s characters that this edit will go a long way towards getting my work in progress to a finished product.

NaNoWriMo Tips 2019

Last October and November, I took on a project that I admittedly didn’t expect to gain much traction. I wrote a series of posts giving advice to those who were participating in NaNoWriMo 2018. As someone who has participated in NaNoWriMo on three different occasions — and finished it twice — I felt like I had a lot of advice I could share that could be beneficial to someone participating for themselves. Much to my surprise, the series went over well, with four of the posts in the series making my top 20 posts of the year despite being published with two months (or less) left in 2018.

I wanted to get a bit more of a headstart on the project this year, however, I also wanted to try something new in the process. What I’d like to do is to see what those of you who are considering participating in NaNoWriMo would like for me to write about. What questions about the month-long writing endeavor do you have?

I’m not sure exactly how many topics I’ll write about this year. With that said, I’ve listed the topics I wrote about last year below. While I’m not opposed to revisiting a particular topic and putting a different spin on it if there’s enough interest, I would like to see what new topics you all would like for me to write about.

If there’s a specific topic you’d like for me to write about, leave me a comment and suggest it. I’m going to work on planning out my post schedule over the next couple of weeks so that I can begin writing them in early October (as I learned last year, this project takes a while).

If you don’t have a topic you’d like me to write about, I would still love to hear what you’re planning on writing about for this NaNoWriMo. Leave your story I’d in the comments. I’d love to talk about them.

WIP Update #4

Inner monologue: It feels like progress on my book has been going really slow. I can’t imagine what I’d even have to talk about since the last time I wrote a formal WIP update post.

*re-reads the last update post*

Inner monologue: Oh. Shit. There’s actually been progress for once. Well, let’s get to it.

This post is both a long time coming and yet a post where I feel like there’s still a long way to go. There’s been a lot I’ve done on my book since February — some of which I’ll be discussing in greater detail in this post. However, to quickly summarize, I have done the following since my last post about my work in progress:

  • Finished the first draft of the book
  • Written a preview scene for the sequel1More on this further down. to the book
  • Finished a second draft for the book
  • Torn apart my book with my editor/creative director/whatever she is2Hi again.
  • Finished a third draft for the book
  • Had a mental breakdown about a lot of things3This actually happening more than once, but only one of those times did it lead to me venting about my frustrations with writing. which manifested itself in a mental breakdown post about writing
  • Drew* out what some of the characters in the book looked like
  • Plotted out the basic premise of the series that will (hopefully) come out of this book

I’m writing this post in early July, so it’s certainly possible I could add something to that list between now and when this post goes live mid-July. That said, even if I make no changes to the above list4Note: I made no changes., that’s still a ton of shit I’ve gotten done.

As I mentioned before, I was debating whether or not this was going to be a series. I’ve ultimately decided that there will be a series coming out of this book, which has meant a good bit as I was going back and editing, particularly when working on draft number three. Oddly enough though, had I decided against making this a series, it really wouldn’t have changed the ending to this book all that much. Because of the sci-fi setting this book takes place in, there’s a lot that was left to the interpretation of my mind more than anything else. As this relates to the ending of my work in progress, it allowed me to have the kind of ending I wanted to the book regardless of the route I ended up choosing.

You may have noticed on the next to last point that I have an asterisk next to drew. This is because I have a bit of a unique problem when it comes to art. Specifically, I suck at art. That said, I really wanted to be able to have some context for what my characters looked like beyond what was in my head. So I did what any rational person who was bad at art yet has access to a computer would do: I created my characters in The Sims 3. I’m not quite ready to post those character mockups on here yet — mostly because I want to do that once the book goes into the beta reading stage (or shortly thereafter). That said, I did share a couple of them this month for my Patreon subscribers, so…hint hint.

I already plan to do a whole post about the editing process once that’s done, however, I do want to take a moment to call out a specific part of the editing process that I didn’t expect to go through. I’ve been doing a lot of reading this year across various genres, reading a bunch of books that range from amazing to absolutely horrid. Nearly every book I’ve read this year has caused me to re-think some part of my work in progress. In particular, Every Tool’s a Hammer by Adam Savage caused me to really consider how much I’m working in conversations that don’t advance the plot of the story but serve to add depth to characters. As someone who loves books that do this, but am not always the best about it myself, it was a great reminder to have.

At this point, I’m probably still at least one draft away from getting beta readers for the story. With that said, when I am ready, I’ll be holding a call for beta readers on this blog (and maybe on my Twitter) after offering to some folks who have already expressed interest in doing so. Hopefully the beta reading experience will be good, as my only experience for it comes from short stories rather than a full novel.

That’s all I have to share for an update for now. My hope is to have an additional update by the end of the year, though I’m not particularly sure exactly what the timeline will be. Thanks for sticking around during the long time that this story has taken. I’m thinking it’ll be worth everyone’s patience.

WIP Update #3

My inner monologue: Oh hey. Are we at the six month mark where we provide an update to the novel you’ve been working on fort he better part of a year now?

*Checks calendar*

Also me: Yeah. Well, more or less. But it was a really shitty six months where I didn’t get much done because I was struggling with a ton of shit mentally. I was to the point where I felt like I was in a rut I’d never get out of1I wrote about this for an upcoming post that will go up at some point in (likely) March.. You can’t have expected me to write during that time.

My inner monologue: Did you write anything new in story?

Also me: Yes…

My inner monologue: Let’s hear about it then.

Also me: Finnnnneeeeeee.

Oh hey. Happy…*checks calendar again*…February. I know some of you are wondering how my work in progress of a novel is going. Especially since I decided to make finishing a draft (or two) of it one of my writing goals for this year. And yes, I know that doing a separate work in progress update post doesn’t exempt me from my regularly scheduled quarterly goal update posts, but if there’s any way I can get more posts out of the same amount of content with how busy I’ve been the last couple of months, I’m going to take advantage of it.

When we last checked in on my progress of the first draft, I had around 35,000 words and just under half of my chapters written. I can happily say that — as of writing this — the draft is now over 53,000 words, with 21 of the 26 planned chapters written, as well as the 22nd chapter started. At this point, it’s looking like the initial draft of the book will end up somewhere in the 65,000-75,000 word range, which is a bit short of where I’d ideally like to have the book when it’s completed. That said, I’ve already identified a few areas of the book that will receive some significant expanding in the second draft. Part of this will be for world building reasons, while part of it will be to better flesh out the backstory of one or two of the main characters.

On the plus side, being this far into the draft has gotten me to the point where I’m comfortable discussing some of the broader points of the book in a bit more detail. Since I’m still WAY far out from having this book ready for publishing in any capacity, I’ve deceided to limit that sharing to those who support me on Patreon rather than the general public. One of this month’s rewards was a podcast giving a little context as to two of the main characters of the story, but I’ll be expanding on this more in the coming months. If you’d like some of those pre-release updates, you could always consider supporting me on Patreon. Wink wink nudge nudge.

I’m also hoping that this first book will become part of a larger series. While I don’t have too much I can share about that at this point, I will say that there will be a noticeable tonal shift between this book — which is intended to be a sci-fi slice of life love(ish) story — to the rest of the series (which will keep the sci-fi parts, though not so much on the slice of life or love story parts). There are a couple of characters in this work in progress that will feature heavily in the rest of the series, hence wanting to build up backstory for those characters as I mentioned above.

I’m still hoping to have the first draft done by mid-April, which will require some significant writing over the course of this week to be a safe bet. Time after this week has the potential to get a bit more scarce2For reasons I’ll share in a later post., so if I can crank out an additional chapter or two before the middle of the month, it’ll make hitting that deadline a bit easier.

Of the various projects I’ve been working on, this is definitely the one I can remember being the most excited about. I wrote the short story that this project is based off of nearly two years ago at this point, so it’s been a story whose plot and characters I’ve become quite attached to. I’m excited to eventually share it with all of you.

NaNoWriMo Tips: You Did It! Now What?

Welcome to the final post of my NaNoWriMo tips series. For other tips in this series, as well as a schedule for future posts, take a look at the links below. Today’s tip and my discussion of it can be found immediately below the schedule.



First off, it’s time for some really large font and capital letters. Because caps lock is cruise control for cool.

CONGRATULATIONS! YOU DID IT! YOU WON NANOWRIMO!

The fact that you were able to finish a 50,0001At least. word novel in 30 days is a really exciting achievement. I know that I was incredibly excited — and somewhat relieved — both times that I finished. It felt like this immense weight was lifted off of my shoulders. It wasn’t a bad weight either. Just a weird, oh lord, did I just do that, kind of weight.

We’ve reached a point in the NaNoWriMo process that I admittedly know very little about. That is, what should you do after NaNoWriMo. You’d think I’d know a lot about it, having won NaNoWriMo twice before. With that said, I’ve done the same thing following the project both times — in that I’ve done nothing. If your entire goal for NaNoWriMo was to just see if you could write your novel during these thirty days and nothing more, that may very well be the best follow up for you. You’ve completed your project, you don’t plan to do anything more with it, so sit back, get yourself a celebratory dinner, and enjoy the fact that you did it.

What I’ve found is a bit more common amongst those who participate in NaNoWriMo is that they want to do something

I will say that my personal recommendation — regardless of what you’re looking to do as follow up with your story — is to take a little bit of time to relax before you get into whatever it is you’re doing with your story next. Remember: you just wrote 50,000 words or more in 30 days. Even taking a day or two off to relax can be refreshing, giving you the energy to help take on whatever your next task is with your story. Making progress is important, but so is your mental health. Don’t neglect the latter in favor of the former.

I Want to Edit My Book

For a first-time NaNoWriMo winner, this is likely the most logical next step to your journey. Since you wrote your story so quickly, there’s likely a lot of work you’ll need to do on it. How much you do in the editing process, particularly if you don’t plan to publish it, is somewhat up to you.

One of the best articles I’ve read about self-editing a book comes from New York Book Editors. I’d encourage you to click on the link in the previous sentence and give that a read if you plan to do any level of editing to your book. In addition to what they say in that post, I’d offer two pieces of advice that have helped me when I was editing.

First off, focus on minor edits such as typos and consistency within individual chapters. While this is admittedly a smaller part of the project, you’ll find that you’ll be able to make a ton of progress just within your first pass or two in the book from this strategy. Second, take a look at your book from a broader view and see if you can keep track of the various plot lines in the story. This will help you to identify if you’ve been consistent throughout your story, not to mention potentially identifying plot holes you may have created in writing quickly.

If you plan to get serious about your editing — particularly in anticipation of publishing or self-publishing — I’d strongly recommend hiring an editor. While I’m an editor myself — and I’m currently available for a limited number projects if anyone needs their NaNoWriMo book edited – I actively sought out an editor when I was going through the publishing process for my first book. When you’re self-editing a book, there will b

I Want to (Self?) Publish My Book

In a probably-not-all-that-shocking statement, publishers and self-publishing sites get flooded with new content following NaNoWriMo by authors looking to get their book published. As you might expect, this can not only cause publishers to be backed up in reviewing content, but they’ve also commonly needing to review poorly written, lightly edited works that aren’t fit for publishing.

If you’re serious about publishing or self-publishing your book, I encourage you to take your time. Be thorough about your editing, beta reading, and what not as I mentioned above. Find someone you’re willing to pay for good cover art. Give things a little time to die down following the NaNoWriMo rush. I’ve talked a bit about my self-publishing experiences in the past here if you’re curious, though I’d encourage you to seek out other authors on Twitter (such as Eve Jacob and Rebecca MacCeile) who have gone through the self-publishing process for their thoughts as well.

I Want to Lift a Character from My Book for a New Book

This strategy is admittedly one of my favorite things to do with short stories. I’ve taken characters from various short stories and turned them into a basis for my 2011 and 2015 NaNoWriMo projects, as well as my current work in progress. It’s a fantastic strategy, as it lets you do a trial run with the character prior to doing a full-fledged story with them.

Someone recently alerted me to the idea of potentially using your NaNoWriMo project as a way to trial various characters that you may want to use in a later story to see how you feel about them. Basically, you take a side character from your NaNoWriMo project, then make your next book or short story a focus on them. I hadn’t really thought about this potential angle for a project in the past, however I do think it could have some benefits. The only potential downside to this is that you did just write a 50,000 word story as a trial for a character that might not have even been the main character of that story. So long as you’re okay with that, I say go for it. While I’ve not tried this longer path to developing a character myself, I will say the turning a short story character into a novel character has worked amazingly for me. I’d have to imagine this idea would work well too.

I Want to Turn My Book Into a Series

One of the best NaNoWriMo books I’ve read was the 2011 NaNoWriMo book by my friend Erin. She posted it chapter by chapter on her blog2Just as I did with mine that year. and by the end of the month, I was clamoring for her to do a sequel to the book3Mostly because I really wanted to know how the ancillary characters in the book were going to deal with the fallout of the death of one of the book’s two main characters.. Though Erin hasn’t yet done a follow up to that story4Possibly because she killed off the functional main character of the story., there are tons of people who use NaNoWriMo as a springboard to writing a series of books. 

Turning a book into a series can be a great idea, however if you went into this NaNoWriMo without much of a plan as to what you were going to write about, I’d strongly encourage you to take some time to make a general plan of where you’re looking to go with your series, its plot, your characters, and any other relevant information you’ll need to make your NaNoWriMo project into a series. I recommend going through a bit of editing of your original manuscript prior to trying to start that series as well, as the edits you make may help drive the direction of your series (not to mention your edited story).


Thank you so much for reading the posts that have been part of my NaNoWriMo Tips series. This was a lot of work to put together, but it was definitely worth it. I do want to give a thank you to various folks who helped me with this series in some way5Intentionally or otherwise., be that promoting it, reading it, or anything else.

  • /r/nanowrimo
  • Erin M.
  • Eve Jacob
  • Rebecca MacCeile
  • C. Laidig

Finally, I want to give a huge thank you to Stephanie for hearing me out and helping me think through this series from the beginning, even when it was just an idea that had no footing. Her guidance to the word vomit of ideas I sometimes spit out is invaluable. I don’t think most of the writing I do — particularly my fiction writing — would have as coherent of a thought process as it does without her input.


Like my NaNoWriMo tips series? Have questions for me about the topics posted daily? Do you just want to talk about your story and have nowhere else to do so? Leave a comment and join the discussion.

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